Tag Archives: Ecological Wisdom

Upcoming events: conservation, peace, music, and budget talk

Community Conservation: Making Land Protection Relevant in the Communities Where It Occurs

  • What: Dave Sands, Executive Director, Nebraska Land Trust
  • When: Thursday, June 8, 7 p.m.
  • Where: Unitarian Church, 6300 A Street, Lincoln
  • More info.

Nebraskans for Peace Annual Rice & Beans Potluck Fundraiser

  • What: Annual event for building peaceful, just and beloved communities of resistance!
  • When: Saturday, June 10, 6 p.m.
  • Where: Hanscom Park United Methodist Church, 4444 Frances St., Omaha (One Block South of 45th & Center Street)
  • More info.

A Future of Care and Peacemaking or War and Waste? The 2018 Federal Budget

  • What: Music, spiritual resources, and resources to resist provided at rally. Drum and Lakota prayer, Pastor Lin Quenzer. Speaker is Kevin Martin from PeaceAction.
  • Where: West side of the Nebraska Capitol
  • When: Sunday June 11, 1 p.m.
  • More info.

Discussion about Soil Health and Climate Change

  • What: Discussion organized by the Nebraska League of Conservation Voters. This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.
  • When: Tuesday, June 20, 5:30 p.m. to 7 p.m.
  • Where: Barbara Weitz Community Engagement Center, University of Nebraska Omaha
  • More info and register.

Discussion about the Plight of the Honeybee

  • What: Free and open to the public. Light refreshments provided.
  • When: Tuesday, June 27, 5:30 PM – 7:00 PM
  • Where: UNL Student Union, Lincoln
  • More info and register.

NRDC: Still No Approved Route for KXL in Nebraska

From the Natural Resources Defense Council:

Yes, Trump has green-lighted the controversial Keystone XL pipeline. But Nebraska’s got a slew of public hearings on the calendar, and legal challenges loom large.

“Trump administration approves Keystone XL pipeline,” the headlines blared. It was March 24, only two months after he’d taken office, when it appeared that President Trump had cleared the way for the long-contested tar sands conduit with a stroke of his pen. In reality, summarily declaring that the pipeline is in the national interest—despite a seven-year U.S. State Department review process that had concluded the opposite—won’t magically bring it to life. The president, together with TransCanada, the energy company behind the Keystone XL pipeline, still have many obstacles to overcome before Canadian tar sands crude can flow through KXL and into the United States.

The first formidable hurdle they face is the state of Nebraska, which TransCanada has treated with contempt in recent years. First, the company drew the pipeline’s route through the heart of the state’s fragile Sand Hills ecosystem. Confronted by environmental concerns, TransCanada said that rerouting the pipeline would be “impossible.” Mounting resistance, however, forced the oil giant to relent and nudge the proposed route around some of the most sensitive parts of the Sand Hills. The pipeline would still, however, run through the important Ogallala aquifer—one of our largest underground stores of freshwater, which would be at significant risk in the event of a leak.

Now that the controversial tar sands pipeline has been reactivated by President Trump’s decision, TransCanada must obtain the consent of the Nebraska Public Service Commission and secure easements from the landowners along the proposed route through the Cornhusker State. It will not be smooth sailing

Read the full policy primer.

LJS Editorial: Paris exit a black eye for US

From the Lincoln Journal Star editorial board:

By withdrawing from the international Paris agreement to curb global warming worldwide, the United States landed in less-than-inspiring company on climate change.

The only two other countries in the world not participating in the accord are Nicaragua (which actually pushed for more stringent efforts) and Syria (whose president is committing atrocities against his own people). This is the company Americans now keep.

President Donald Trump claimed growing the U.S. economy and protecting American jobs were the primary reasons for the exit. However, those claims aren’t backed by the overwhelming negative reaction by American businesses – and the mountains of scientific evidence and an ever-warming Earth that threatens cities and economies, including Nebraska’s.

Though rising sea levels won’t directly threaten the Cornhusker State, climatologists at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln have seen a spike in severe precipitation events in recent years. Nebraska Game and Parks biologists warn of dangers to native species and increased spread of invasive species and pathogens.

Forecasts call for more than two weeks a year of 100-plus-degree weather and decreased river volume for drinking and irrigation. More extreme shifts, including floods and droughts, are predicted in the coming decades.

These will affect all Nebraskans, regardless of location and employment.

Read the full editorial.

Green Drinks in Omaha May 24

Here is a friendly reminder that Omaha Green Drinks will be taking place this upcoming Wednesday, May 24, at 5:30 p.m. at Whole Foods Market, 10020 Regency Pkwy, Omaha.

Carpool, cycle, walk, or ride the bus! This is a great way to network, inspire, share ideas, and catch up with other “Green” people!

Please RSVP on Facebook.

Learn about habitat loss and biodiversity May 23 in Omaha

From Nebraska League of Conservation Voters:

On May 23, we will host a discussion about habitat loss and biodiversity, featuring Dr. LaReesa Wolfenbarger and Dr. Chris Helzer.

  • What: Discussion about Habitat Loss and Biodiversity
  • When: Tuesday, May 23, 6:30 PM – 7:30 PM
  • Where: UNO’s College of Public Affairs and Community Service, located at 6320 Maverick Plaza, Omaha, NE 68182

This event is free and open to the public. Light refreshments will be provided.

Habitat loss is the number one reason why species go extinct, and thus poses a major threat to biodiversity on our planet. When humans convert wild areas for agriculture, forestry, urban development, or water projects (including dams, hydropower, and irrigation), they reduce or eliminate its usefulness as a habitat for the other species that live there.

Dr. LaReesa Wolfenbarger and Dr. Chris Helzer are two of Nebraska’s top experts on biodiversity and habitat loss, so you won’t want to miss this event!

Learn more about Dr. Wolfenbarger and Dr. Helzer.

Space is limited! To attend the event, please register here.

Keystone XL public hearing May 3 in York

From BOLD Nebraska:

The Nebraska Public Service Commission has not yet announced any additional public meetings on the Keystone XL pipeline route other than  Wednesday, May 3, in York at the Holthus Convention Center. So this is your next opportunity to make your voice heard on KXL. Speakers are limited to five minutes; first-come, first-serve.

(The formal intervenor hearings Aug. 7-11 in Lincoln are also expected to include an opportunity for public testimony, at the end of the week).

  • Holthus Convention Center, 3130 Holen Ave, York
  • Wednesday, May 3, 2017
  • Doors open at 8 a.m.; hearing from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m.
  • A rally and press conference are planed for noon to 1:30 p.m.

RSVP through BOLD Nebraska.

Join the Facebook event.

Lincoln Climate March draws hundreds

From the Lincoln Journal Star:

More than 200 protesters gathered Saturday morning to voice their concerns about climate change and its lack of acceptance by the public and elected officials.

Participants marched from the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Student Union to the State Capitol before gathering at The Bourbon Theatre. The event was one of more than 300 satellite marches across the globe.

John Atkeison, the lead organizer of the Lincoln march, said the protest was meant to get the attention of more than just elected officials.

“The main motivating force for dealing with change is at the grass roots,” he said. “The politicians that are in power now don’t address the problem. They’ve been doing little or nothing about it.”

Read the full story.

Upcoming marches: Support science and climate action, demand Trump’s tax returns

Tax March: Demanding the release of President Trump’s tax returns.

Lincoln Tax March

  • Saturday, April 15, 2017, 12 p.m.
  • Nebraska State Capitol Building
  • 1445 K Street
  • Lincoln, NE  68508

Omaha Tax March

  • Saturday, April 15, 2017, 1 p. m.
  • Turner Park
  • 3101 Dodge Street
  • Omaha, NE 68131

March for Science: Supporting the scientific method and evidence-based policies.

March for Science – Lincoln

  • Saturday, April 22, 2017, 3 – 4 p.m.
  • Nebraska Union, 1400 R Street
  • Marching from the Union through Centennial Mall to the Nebraska State Capitol

March for Science – Omaha

  • Saturday, April 22, 2017, 5:30 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Marching from Elmwood Park to Stinson Park

March for Science, Climate, and Social Justice – Hastings

  • Saturday, April 22, 2017, 12:30 – 2 p.m.
  • Hastings, NE

People’s Climate March: Standing up for the climate, for jobs, and for justice.

People’s Climate March, Lincoln

  • Saturday, April 29, 2017, 10:30am
  • Nebraska State Capitol Building
  • 1445 K Street
  • Lincoln, NE

People’s Climate March, Omaha

2016 Green Party Vice Presidential Candidate Ajamu Baraka has accepted our invitation to speak at the Omaha event, starting at noon. The march will start at 2 p.m.

  • Saturday, April 29, 2017, 12:00pm
  • Gene Leahy Mall
  • 1302 Farnam
  • Omaha, NE

Tell the Nebraska Public Service Commission: Consider climate in KXL decision

From 350.org:

In Nebraska, there is still no permitted route for Keystone. Eighty-five landowners are refusing to give up their land to make way for the pipeline, and thousands more people are rallying to deny TransCanada their Nebraska permit for Keystone XL. They’re asking pipeline fighters from across the United States to support these efforts by submitting comments to Nebraska’s Public Service Commission urging them to include climate in their assessment and oppose the permit.

If built, this pipeline would poison our climate, air, water, land and communities, and violate Indigenous rights. Take action now to urge the Nebraska Public Service Commission to consider climate in their assessment of whether Keystone XL is in the public interest and to deny the permit for the project.

Send a message to the Commission via 350.org

Environmental groups file lawsuit seeking to stop KXL

From the Columbus Telegram:

National environmental groups and the company seeking to build the Keystone XL pipeline fired separate legal volleys Thursday over the contentious project.

Environmental groups — including one that got its start in Nebraska — made good on a promise to file a lawsuit seeking to reverse President Donald Trump’s green-lighting of the Keystone XL project.

Meanwhile, TransCanada filed a motion with the Nebraska Public Service Commission urging it to reject 56 people and groups seeking intervener status in the review of the Keystone XL route through the Cornhusker state, including the Nebraska Ponca and Yankton Sioux tribes and environmental and public-health advocacy groups.

More than 100 people and organizations, including more than 90 landowners and three labor unions, have petitioned to intervene, which would allow them to file legal briefs, cross-examine witnesses and present formal arguments to the PSC alongside TransCanada’s attorneys.

Read the full story.